The year is 1922. Edward Wheeler Hall, an episcopal priest, and Eleanor Reinhardt Mills, a member of his choir, are found dead near a farm in Franklin Township. Investigations revealed there was an affair between them; therefore the motive was beginning to form in the minds of local detectives. Hall's wife, Frances Noel Stevens Hall, and her brothers stood accused of murder, and the papers could not stop writing about the case. In the end, they were acquitted for lack of sufficient evidence. No one else was suspected or charged. 

Skipping ahead to 1969: Julius Bolyog, a Hungarian immigrant, finally comes forward with further information on the case. He had been friendly with Willie Stevens, one of the accused brothers. His story was broadcast by WINS, a New York City radio station, in approximately 1969. The broadcast can be listened to here in 8 report segments, each no more than 5 minutes long. Click the links below to access the MP3 files.

  • Part 1 
    This first segment introduces the listener to the Hall-Mills murder case and the recent development of Julius Bolyog coming forward with information.
  • Part 2 
    This segment delves into the murder case a bit more, with information about the "Pig Woman" and how her testimony came into play.
  • Part 3 
    This segment explains more about Bolyog's involvement.
  • Part 4 
    This segment discusses how Bolyog's story was met by officials.
  • Part 5 
    This segment speaks to why Bolyog came forward when he did, and what officials did with the information he gave them.
  • Part 6 
    This segment discusses evidence supporting Bolyog's story.
  • Part 7 
    This segment speaks to the continuing investigation.
  • Part 8 
    This final segment explains why Bolyog remained silent for so long, and wraps up the story.

A reel-to-reel tape of the broadcasts was acquired by the New Brunswick Free Public Library from the Home News Tribune office in East Brunswick, New Jersey, in 2013. It is not known if the audio recording was made at WINS or recorded off the air. The library had the audio tape converted into a digital format and made transcriptions of the entire recording, which can be downloaded here.